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By Adrian Poole

During this better half, best students and critics handle the paintings of the main celebrated and enduring novelists from the British Isles (excluding dwelling writers): between them Defoe, Richardson, Sterne, Austen, Dickens, the Brontës, George Eliot, Hardy, James, Lawrence, Joyce, and Woolf. the importance of every author of their personal time is defined, the relation in their paintings to that of predecessors and successors explored, and their most vital novels analysed. those essays don't objective to create a canon in a prescriptive manner, yet taken jointly they describe a powerful constructing culture of the writing of fictional prose during the last three hundred years. This quantity is a important consultant for these learning and instructing the radical, and should let readers to contemplate the importance of much less universal authors resembling Henry eco-friendly and Elizabeth Bowen along people with a extra proven position in literary background.

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Means here, and three italicised ‘verys’, not one or two. After the shipwreck (for this is another), the traumatised city returns to its ways, and ‘the People harden’d by the Danger they had been in, like Seamen after a Storm is over, were . . more bold and hardened in their Vices’ (JPY, 229). This is the vicious world portrayed in Moll Flanders: the world in which, as Moll writes in a premature moment of complacency and repose, ‘now I seem’d landed in a safe Harbour’ (MF, 188). ’s with different and more teasingly ironic narrative stances.

After the shipwreck (for this is another), the traumatised city returns to its ways, and ‘the People harden’d by the Danger they had been in, like Seamen after a Storm is over, were . . more bold and hardened in their Vices’ (JPY, 229). This is the vicious world portrayed in Moll Flanders: the world in which, as Moll writes in a premature moment of complacency and repose, ‘now I seem’d landed in a safe Harbour’ (MF, 188). ’s with different and more teasingly ironic narrative stances. Both heroines are mysterious about identities that they veil as much as disclose, and they make themselves known to the reader only by pseudonyms; both pride themselves on using language not just to persuade but to beguile.

18 The Poems of Alexander Pope, vol. III, The Dunciad (1728) and The Dunciad Variorum (1729), ed. Valerie Rumbold (Harlow: Longman, 2007), p. 127). For the implications of Pope’s slur (which compares Defoe with dissidents under Charles I whose ears were actually severed), see my ‘Defoe’s Ears: The Dunciad, the Pillory, and Seditious Libel’, in The Eighteenth-Century Novel 7 6–7 (2009); Special Double Volume; Essays in Honor of John Richetti. 19 Daniel Defoe, The True-Born Englishman and Other Writings (hereafter TBE), ed.

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