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By Lindsay Ann Reid

Ovidian Bibliofictions and the Tudor publication examines the ancient and the fictionalized reception of Ovid's poetry within the literature and books of Tudor England. It does so during the research of a selected set of Ovidian narratives-namely, these about the protean heroines of the Heroides and Metamorphoses. within the overdue medieval and Renaissance eras, Ovid's poetry inspired the vernacular imaginations of authors starting from Geoffrey Chaucer and John Gower to Isabella Whitney, William Shakespeare, and Michael Drayton. Ovid's English proteges replicated and extended upon the Roman poet's particular and often remarked 'bookishness' of their personal diversifications of his works. concentrating on the postclassical discourses that Ovid's poetry inspired, Ovidian Bibliofictions and the Tudor ebook engages with shiny present debates in regards to the booklet as fabric item because it explores the Ovidian-inspired mythologies and bibliographical aetiologies that proficient the sixteenth-century production, replica, and illustration of books. extra, writer Lindsay Ann Reid's discussions of Ovidianism supply substitute versions for pondering the dynamics of reception, version, and imitatio.While there's a tremendous physique of released paintings on Ovid and Chaucer in addition to at the ubiquitous Ovidianism of the 1590s, there was relatively little scholarship on Ovid's reception among those eras. Ovidian Bibliofictions and the Tudor publication starts off to fill this hole among the a long time of Chaucer and Shakespeare via dedicating recognition to the literature of the early Tudor period. In so doing, this publication additionally contributes to present discussions surrounding medieval/Renaissance periodization.

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Extra resources for Ovidian Bibliofictions and the Tudor Book: Metamorphosing Classical Heroines in Late Medieval and Renaissance England

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1590 prologue to his Eneydos [Aeneid], defers to Skelton’s expertise in terms flattering to the newly crowned laureate: But I praye Mayster John Skelton, late created poete laureate in the Unyversite of Oxenforde, to oversee and correcte this sayd booke and t’addresse and expowne where as shalle be founde faulte to theym that shall requyre it. … I suppose he hath dronken of Elycon’s well. I here cite from Caxton’s Own Prose, ed. F. Blake (London, 1973), 80–81. 41 Introduction 19 Scrope (an inscribed version of the daughter of Skelton’s real-life acquaintance Richard Scrope) is mourning the recent death of a pet sparrow.

44 I cite the text of Skelton’s The Boke of Phyllyp Sparowe from John Skelton: The Complete English Poems, ed. John Scattergood (New York, 1983), 7–9. Subsequent parenthetical line numbers for all of Skelton’s works refer to this edition, and English translations have been adopted from this same source. 43 20 Ovidian Bibliofictions and the Tudor Book Noble Hector of Troye; In lyke maner also Encreaseth my dedly wo, For my sparowe is go. (108–14) Of Medeas arte, I wolde I had a parte Of her crafty magyke!

I suppose he hath dronken of Elycon’s well. I here cite from Caxton’s Own Prose, ed. F. Blake (London, 1973), 80–81. 41 Introduction 19 Scrope (an inscribed version of the daughter of Skelton’s real-life acquaintance Richard Scrope) is mourning the recent death of a pet sparrow. Skelton’s 1,400 line “boke” can be roughly divided into three main sections: the first 844 lines comprise a dramatic monologue, delivered in Jane’s purported voice, for the erstwhile bird; the second section serves as a 422 line encomium on Jane’s beauty, written from the perspective of Skelton’s poetic persona; and the final 116 lines, a later addition to the text, function as an appended protest against the criticism that the first two sections of the poem supposedly attracted in the work’s early years of manuscript circulation.

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