Download Music in Biblical Life: The Roles of Song in Ancient Israel by Jonathan L. Friedmann PDF

By Jonathan L. Friedmann

Tune used to be imperative to the everyday life of historical Israel. It followed actions as assorted as handbook hard work and royal processionals. At key junctures and in middle associations, musical tones have been used to bring messages, express feelings, enhance communal bonds and identify human-divine touch. This publication explores the tricky and multifaceted nature of biblical song via an in depth look at 4 significant episodes and genres: the music of the ocean (Exod. 15), King Saul and David's harp (1 Sam. 16), using song in prophecy, and the booklet of Psalms. This research demonstrates how tune contributed to shaping and outline the self-identity of old Israel.

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58 Whatever the case, they are presented as 41 Music in Biblical Life past occurrences, or, perhaps more accurately, as foregone conclusions. 59 The Song concludes with a coda exclaiming God’s eternal reign (v. 18), and a verse led by Miriam reiterating God’s triumph over Pharaoh’s forces (v. 21). The designation of the Song as an archetype of congregational music is justified for at least four reasons. First, it was a communal outpouring. Moses and the Israelites sang the prayer together (v. 1), and it is followed by a short refrain sung by Miriam and the women (vv.

7); “the blast of Your nostrils” (v. 8); “floods stood straight like a wall” (v. 8); “They sank like lead” (v. 10); “The earth swallowed them up” (v. 12); “All the dwellers of are aghast” (v. 15); and “they are still as stone” (v. 77 These stirring images combine with praise language —“The Lord is my strength and might” (v. 2), “Who is like You, O Lord, among the mighty” (v. — to embolden the formerly enslaved nation. As a martial and religious song, it inspired collective feelings of triumph, honor and self-confidence, and assured the faithful — in those days and in future generations— that they were favored in the eye of the sovereign and steadfast God.

13 –17). 58 Whatever the case, they are presented as 41 Music in Biblical Life past occurrences, or, perhaps more accurately, as foregone conclusions. 59 The Song concludes with a coda exclaiming God’s eternal reign (v. 18), and a verse led by Miriam reiterating God’s triumph over Pharaoh’s forces (v. 21). The designation of the Song as an archetype of congregational music is justified for at least four reasons. First, it was a communal outpouring. Moses and the Israelites sang the prayer together (v.

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