Download Medieval Marriage: Literary Approaches, 1100-1300 by Neil Cartlidge PDF

By Neil Cartlidge

This ebook makes use of literary texts to track the advance of medieval pondering marriage within the 12th and 13th centuries, making an allowance for not just vital advancements in theological and felony considering marriage in this interval, yet conventions corresponding to `courtly love', which impact its portrayal in literary texts. the focal point of this examine is upon England, and in particular 3 teams of texts associated jointly via English manuscripts -the `AB'-Group, containing the Ancrene Wisse; The Owl and the Nightingale and its companion-pieces; and at last the lifetime of St Christina of Markyate and the Chanson de Saint Alexiswhich she as soon as owned. the writer demonstrates the continuity of those texts of their perspective in the direction of marriage, in addition to continental works equivalent to the letters of Abelard and Heloise, and Chr?tien de Troyes' Erec et Enide. all through, the amount in actual fact and accessibly indicates how the creative literature of the interval participated within the evolution of a brand new and enduring ideology of marriage.Dr NEIL CARTLIDGEis a study Fellow at Wolfson collage, Oxford.

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42; Örsy, p. 280. 69Digest, 50. 17. 30 (Krueger, p. 921); cf. 35. 1. 15 (p. 540); quoted by Brooke, Idea, p. 128. However, it has been suggested that such statements are Christian interpolations (see Clark, p. 30). 70 Brundage, Law, p. 34. On consensus generally in Roman and medieval law, see Gaudemet, 'Définition', p. 108; Le Bras, DTC, cc. 21347; Goody, pp. 86, 2056; Herlihy, p. 8; Leclercq, Monks, pp. 12; Delhaye, 'Development', p. 86. 71 Brooke, Idea, p. 104; cf. Lucas, p. 66. Foucault resolves this contradiction diachronically (Care, pp.

19091. 44 Molin and Mutembe, pp. 367; Brooke, Idea, pp. 24857; Lucas, p. 96. Brooke has suggested that "the development of splendid church porches in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries owed something to new matrimonial fashions" ('Marriage and Society', p. 29; 'Idea', pp. 2536; cf. Le Bras, 'Mariage', p. 198). Similarly, Meyer (pp. 2923) has suggested that the deep whetting-marks found in many German churches can be explained by ecclesiastical patronage of what had previously been a secular marriage-ceremony using a sword as a token of good faith: cf.

15 (p. 540); quoted by Brooke, Idea, p. 128. However, it has been suggested that such statements are Christian interpolations (see Clark, p. 30). 70 Brundage, Law, p. 34. On consensus generally in Roman and medieval law, see Gaudemet, 'Définition', p. 108; Le Bras, DTC, cc. 21347; Goody, pp. 86, 2056; Herlihy, p. 8; Leclercq, Monks, pp. 12; Delhaye, 'Development', p. 86. 71 Brooke, Idea, p. 104; cf. Lucas, p. 66. Foucault resolves this contradiction diachronically (Care, pp. 7280). 72 Moule, p.

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