Download A Companion to Romantic Poetry by Charles Mahoney (ed.) PDF

By Charles Mahoney (ed.)

Via a sequence of 34 essays via major and rising students, A spouse to Romantic Poetry finds the wealthy range of Romantic poetry and exhibits why it keeps to carry the sort of important and essential position within the background of English literature.

  • Breaking loose from the limits of the traditionally-studied authors, the gathering takes a revitalized method of the sector and brings jointly probably the most intriguing paintings being performed this day
  • Emphasizes poetic shape and process instead of a biographical technique
  • Features essays on creation and distribution and the various colleges and events of Romantic Poetry
  • Introduces modern contexts and views, in addition to the problems and debates that proceed to force scholarship within the box
  • Presents the main complete and compelling number of essays on British Romantic poetry presently on hand

Content:
Chapter 1 Mournful Ditties and Merry Measures: Feeling and shape within the Romantic brief Lyric and track (pages 7–24): Michael O'neill
Chapter 2 Archaist?Innovators: The Couplet from Churchill to Browning (pages 25–43): Simon Jarvis
Chapter three the enticements of Tercets (pages 44–61): Charles Mahoney
Chapter four To Scorn or To “Scorn no longer the Sonnet” (pages 62–77): Daniel Robinson
Chapter five Ballad assortment and Lyric Collectives (pages 78–94): Steve Newman
Chapter 6 Satire, Subjectivity, and Acknowledgment (pages 95–106): William Flesch
Chapter 7 “Stirring shades”: The Romantic Ode and Its Afterlives (pages 107–122): Esther Schor
Chapter eight Pastures New and outdated: The Romantic Afterlife of Pastoral Elegy (pages 123–139): Christopher R. Miller
Chapter nine The Romantic Georgic and the paintings of Writing (pages 140–158): Tim Burke
Chapter 10 Shepherding tradition and the Romantic Pastoral (pages 159–175): John Bugg
Chapter eleven Ear and Eye: Counteracting Senses in Loco?descriptive Poetry (pages 176–194): Adam Potkay
Chapter 12 “Other voices speak”: The Poetic Conversations of Byron and Shelley (pages 195–216): Simon Bainbridge
Chapter thirteen The Thrush within the Theater: Keats and Hazlitt on the Surrey establishment (pages 217–233): Sarah M. Zimmerman
Chapter 14 Laboring?Class Poetry within the Romantic period (pages 234–250): Michael Scrivener
Chapter 15 Celtic Romantic Poetry: Scotland, eire, Wales (pages 251–267): Jane Moore
Chapter sixteen Anglo?Jewish Romantic Poetry (pages 268–284): Karen Weisman
Chapter 17 Leigh Hunt's Cockney Canon: Sociability and Subversion from Homer to Hyperion (pages 285–301): Michael Tomko
Chapter 18 Poetry, dialog, neighborhood: Annus Mirabilis, 1797–1798 (pages 302–317): Angela Esterhammer
Chapter 19 Spontaneity, Immediacy, and Improvisation in Romantic Poetry (pages 319–336): Angela Esterhammer
Chapter 20 star, Gender, and the loss of life of the Poet: The secret of Letitia Elizabeth Landon (pages 337–353): Ghislaine McDayter
Chapter 21 Poetry and representation: “Amicable strife” (pages 354–373): Sophie Thomas
Chapter 22 Romanticism, activity, and overdue Georgian Poetry (pages 374–392): John Strachan
Chapter 23 “The technology of Feelings”: Wordsworth's Experimental Poetry (pages 393–411): Ross Hamilton
Chapter 24 Romanticism, Gnosticism, and Neoplatonism (pages 412–424): Laura Quinney
Chapter 25 Milton and the Romantics (pages 425–441): Gordon Teskey
Chapter 26 “The consider of to not think it,” or the Pleasures of tolerating shape (pages 443–466): Anne?Lise Francois
Chapter 27 Romantic Poetry and Literary idea: The Case of “A shut eye did my Spirit Seal” (pages 467–482): Marc Redfield
Chapter 28 “Strange Utterance”: The (Un)Natural Language of the chic in Wordsworth's Prelude (pages 483–502): Timothy Bahti
Chapter 29 the problem of style within the Romantic chic (pages 503–520): Ian Balfour
Chapter 30 Sexual Politics and the functionality of Gender in Romantic Poetry (pages 521–537): James Najarian
Chapter 31 Blake's Jerusalem: Friendship with Albion (pages 538–553): Karen Swann
Chapter 32 the area with out us: Romanticism, Environmentalism, and Imagining Nature (pages 554–571): Bridget Keegan
Chapter 33 moral Supernaturalism: The Romanticism of Wordsworth, Heaney, and Lacan (pages 572–588): Guinn Batten
Chapter 34 The patience of Romanticism (pages 589–605): Willard Spiegelman

Show description

Read or Download A Companion to Romantic Poetry PDF

Similar gothic & romance books

The Mirror and the Lamp: Romantic Theory and the Critical Tradition (Galaxy Books)

This hugely acclaimed examine analyzes many of the tendencies in English feedback through the first 4 many years of this century.

The Longman anthology of gothic verse

Gothic verse liberated the darkish aspect of Romantic and Victorian verse: its medievalism, depression and morbidity.  a few poets meant in basic terms to surprise or entertain, yet Gothic additionally liberated the inventive mind's eye and encouraged them to go into anxious parts of the psyche and to painting severe states of human cognizance.

Blanchot Romantique: A Collection of Essays

The paintings of French author and essayist Maurice Blanchot (1907-2003) is surely one of the such a lot difficult the 20th century has to supply. modern debate in literature, philosophy, and politics has but to completely recognize its discreet yet enduring impression. coming up from a convention that came about in Oxford in 2009, this publication units itself an easy, if daunting, job: that of measuring the effect and responding to the problem of Blanchot’s paintings via addressing its engagement with the Romantic legacy, particularly (but not just) that of the Jena Romantics.

Additional info for A Companion to Romantic Poetry

Example text

Song” is the place where “wrong” finds itself named; the chances of rhyme seem almost tyrannies as they demand song thrives on wrong. And the very conclusion, with its sense that “lute” and “wreath” (l. 17) will ensure her fame cannot dispel the impression that the poet lives to write, rather than writes about living. Poetry, “The Rhythmical Creation of Beauty,” in Poe’s suggestive phrase from his “The Poetic Principle” (Poe 1982: 894), may demand a heavy price, it sometimes seems, from Romantic makers of short poems, but the continual drive in these poems is toward a tenacious sense of artistic recompense.

H. W. Donner. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul. Beer, John (1998). Providence and Love: Studies in Wordsworth, Channing, Myers, George Eliot, and Ruskin. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Blake, William (1988). The Complete Poetry and Prose of William Blake, commentary Harold Bloom; ed. David V. Erdman. Newly rev. edn. New York: Anchor. Byron, Lord (2000). Lord Byron: The Major Works, ed. Jerome J. McGann. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Chernaik, Judith (1972). The Lyrics of Shelley. Cleveland: Press of Case Western Reserve University.

Italian fathers thus, with barb’rous rage, Fit helpless infants for the squeaking stage; Deaf to the calls of pity, Nature wound, And mangle vigour for the sake of sound. Churchill 1761a: 17). The simile borrows power from a concealed truth. Verse is continuously and ineliminably a process of cutting into language and cutting it up. Nowhere are these ornaments of incision more markedly shown than in Pope’s verse. So to compare verse to castration for the song’s sake is no chance link – and, of course, it reminds us that the voices of castrati were very widely admired indeed, a reminder which brings out that ambivalence which is often present in the kind of complaint Churchill is developing here.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.23 of 5 – based on 37 votes